Library

Robert H. Taylor '30

Bequest from Robert H. Taylor ’30 Supports Princeton University’s Library

June 26th, 2017 / Development Com...

In honor of a generous bequest from Robert H. Taylor of Princeton’s Class of 1930, Princeton University’s librarian will now be known as the Robert H. Taylor 1930 University Librarian. The post is currently held by Anne Jarvis, who came to Princeton from the University of Cambridge in 2016. The gift will also support and expand the library’s Special Collections and establish a new position: Curator of the Robert H. Taylor Collection at Firestone Library.

Firestone Library: Reinvigorating the Intellectual Heart of Princeton University

October 5th, 2015 / Development Com...

Since it opened in 1948, Firestone Library has played a central role in the lives of undergraduates, graduate students, faculty members, and visiting scholars. Now, a major renovation is infusing Firestone Library with new life. With the support of alumni and friends, the University is creating a more open and welcoming building that supports contemporary approaches to scholarship while honoring Firestone’s historic character.

Lawrence Otis Graham ’83: A Lifelong Love of Firestone

June 30th, 2015 / Development Com...

As an ambitious 17-year-old college freshman, Lawrence Otis Graham ’83 set his sights on getting published. He tried pitching two magazines a story on surviving the college admissions interview; both turned him down. Intent on his goal, he headed to Firestone Library to consult nonfiction books on educational issues written for young people.

Scheide Donates Rare Books Library to Princeton

February 13th, 2015 / Development Com...

Musician, musicologist, bibliophile, and philanthropist William H. Scheide, a 1936 Princeton University alumnus who died in November at age 100, has left his extraordinary collection of some 2,500 rare printed books and manuscripts to Princeton University. With an expected appraised value of nearly $300 million, it is the largest gift in the University’s history.

Lapidus Revolutionary-era Collection Digitized for 21st-Century Scholars

February 1st, 2012 / Development Com...

When Thomas Paine wrote Common Sense in 1776 he no doubt hoped his words would endure, but he might be surprised by how they are being preserved. Historians and history enthusiasts can now read one of his pamphlets on a computer screen in its original format, digitally flipping its 50 pages.

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